Why Wright State?

photo of a person in the visualization lab

Our dedication to access, affordability, and preeminence leaves you more prepared than ever to meet the challenges of tomorrow.

Why become an engineer or computer scientist?

As an engineering or computer scientist you can:

  • Work in prestigious professional environments around the world
  • Do exciting, challenging, and diverse work
  • Make technological and scientific discoveries that benefit society
  • Access a variety of financially stable career opportunities
  • Increase your understanding of how things work
Did You Know?

You will be in a high-demand field of study.

The U.S. Department of Labor has projected that by 2018, the U.S. will have more than 1.2 million job openings in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM).

Visit egfi-k12.org to check out even more reasons why engineering and computer science can provide an exciting future for you.

Why be an engineer or computer scientist at Wright State?

Wright State University is situated in a region defined by innovation, which may provide you with unique, hands-on research opportunities with cutting-edge technologies at the undergraduate and graduate levels.

The College of Engineering and Computer Science gives you the right tools for a career:

  • ABET accredited Bachelor of Science degree programs
  • Low-cost, high-value programs
  • Award-winning and experienced faculty who know you by name and care about your success
  • Knowledgeable, hard-working, and caring staff to assist your navigation through college
  • Opportunities in undergraduate teaching and research with faculty who are breaking new ground in their area of expertise
  • Co-ops and internships through the Brandeberry Career Development Center
  • 4+1 path to a master’s degree
  • Prime location near Wright-Patterson Air Force Base and the Air Force Research Lab

But don't take our word for it, come see it for yourself. Contact us at (937) 775-5272 or explorececs@wright.edu to schedule a visit.

Guiding undergraduate education and hands-on research: Dr. Travis Doom