Research

Jaime Ramirez-Vick photoJaime Ramirez-Vick, PhD

Chair
Department of Biomedical, Industrial, & Human Factors Engineering

Research areas include: adult stem cell research for tissue engineering applications in bone and heart, development of nanotechnologies for the treatment and detection of cancer, and development of various types of electrochemical biosensors. Tissue engineering research has focused on the development of 3D biomimetic scaffolds and the use biophysical stimulation to direct mesenchymal stem cell commitment and differentiation. Specifically, using electromagnetic, microgravity, ultrasound and mechanical stimuli while monitoring genetic and epigenetic changes to understand the underlying mechanisms. Also, we are developing multifunctional nanomedical formulations for cancer siRNA therapeutics capable of simultaneous targeting, imaging and drug delivery. In addition, current investigations related to biosensors focus on applying nanostructured electrodes for DNA based detection to identify transcription factor biomarkers for recognition of breast and colorectal cancers at an early stage.


photo of caroline caoCaroline G.L. Cao, PhD

Professor
Ohio Research Scholar for the Ohio Imaging Research and Innovation Network (OIRAIN)
Department of Biomedical, Industrial, & Human Factors Engineering

Research areas include: human factors of medical systems, design and evaluation of enabling technology (e.g., robotics, image guidance, haptics) for minimally invasive surgery, training of surgical skills in real and virtual simulators, and decision-making and team communication in the operating room.


photo of frank CiaralloFrank W. Ciarallo, PhD

Associate Professor
Department of Biomedical, Industrial, & Human Factors Engineering

Research areas include: control and management of supply chain systems, interaction of risk and competition in game theoretic models of inventory systems with multiple competing entities, supply uncertainty and risk in inventory models, multi-objectivization as a technique for solving difficult single-objective optimization problems via evolutionary algorithms, software and conceptual modeling tools for more effective simulation modeling, agent-based modeling of ballistic impacts.


Sherif Elbasiouny, PhDphoto of sherif elbasiouny

Assistant Professor
Departments of Neuroscience, Cell Biology, & Physiology, and Biomedical, Industrial, & Human Factors Engineering

Research areas: neuroengineering and computational neuroscience for analysis of disease mechanisms and identification of drugs targets, neurorehabilitation and sensorimotor control of neural prostheses after peripheral or spinal cord injury, investigation of neurodegenerative diseases (e.g., ALS). Methods employed in the research program include: computational modeling, electrophysiology, immunohistochemistry, behavioral and motor performance analysis, electrical stimulation.


Mary Fendley, PhDphoto of mary fendley

Assistant Professor
Department of Biomedical, Industrial, & Human Factors Engineering

Research areas include: cognitive engineering, modeling, decision analysis, and human factors engineering, metrics development within the intelligence analysis domain, decision aiding for multimodal information processing, modeling from human-in-the-loop testing, cognitive workload evaluation, and decision support for cognitive biases.


photo of tarun GoswamiTarun Goswami, DSc

Professor
Department of Biomedical, Industrial, & Human Factors Engineering

Research areas include studying the applicability of engineering materials in biomedical fields such as total joint replacements and characterizing their mechanics and durability. New bio/nano-material development and assessing their biocompatibility. Design and development of orthopaedic related devices, injury (traumatic brain injury and cervical spinal injury) and device biomechanics assessments. Probabilistic and deterministic design and failure analyses of medical and engineering components. Laboratories supporting these efforts maintain imaging data base, computational modeling and analysis software and mechanical testing of hard bones to research bone mechanics.


photo of ping hePing He, PhD

Professor
Department of Biomedical, Industrial, & Human Factors Engineering

Research areas include: ultrasound tissue characterization, ultrasound image acquisition and processing, biomedical instrumentation, EEG signal processing and analysis.


photo of Nasser KashouNasser H. Kashou, PhD

Assistant Professor
Department of Biomedical, Industrial, & Human Factors Engineering

Dr. Kashou has a background in medical imaging and image processing. Within the last ten years, he has worked on neuroimaging analysis and support, specifically in the field of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Some of this analysis has included functional MRI (fMRI), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and volumetric analysis. His minor areas of specialization have been vision science and neuroscience, specifically oculomotor function. Most recently, he has been working on segmentation of brain regions, DTI and fMRI for mild traumatic brain injury, infantile nystagmus syndrome, convergence insufficiency and the effects of anesthesia on adolescents. Other research interests include neuroimaging using diffuse optical tomography (DOT). Dr. Kashou currently runs the biomedical imaging lab (BMIL) at WSU. He is also the director of the fNIRS (functional Near Infrared Spectroscopy) lab under the BMIL core. This lab consists of a NIRS system along with a portable physiological monitoring unit. Both these labs and the resources available therein are available to potential research students.


photo of pratik ParikhPratik J. Parikh, PhD

Associate Professor
Department of Biomedical, Industrial, & Human Factors Engineering

Research areas include: healthcare systems engineering (patient flow analysis, staff scheduling, readmission prediction), supply chain and distribution network design and analysis, warehouse design, retail layout, revenue management, stochastic modeling/simulation of complex systems


photo of david reynoldsDavid B. Reynolds, PhD

Associate Professor
Department of Biomedical, Industrial, & Human Factors Engineering

Research areas include: new methods for virtual training of amputees with prosthetics, dynamic characterization of pneumatic muscle actuators, and non-blood contacting heart assist devices for bridge to transplant and remote environments


photo of ulas SunarUlas Sunar, PhD

Associate Professor
Department of Biomedical, Industrial, & Human Factors Engineering
Ohio Research Scholar, Ohio Imaging Research and Innovation Network (OIRAIN)

Research areas include: Quantitative imaging of diseases and the brain function in preclinical and clinical settings. Multi-modal imaging-guided intervention and therapy optimization. Particular focus of imaging techniques is multi-spectral diffuse optical imaging, fluorescence tomography and photoacoustic imaging. Quantitated imaging biomarkers include tissue blood flow, oxygenation and drug concentration by using the mathematical modeling of light diffusion in tissue and image reconstruction algorithms.


photo of xinhui ZhangXinhui Zhang, PhD

Associate Professor
Department of Biomedical, Industrial, & Human Factors Engineering

Research area include mathematical modeling, simulation, optimization in area of manufacturing, logistics and transportation, media management, and service operations. High impact research includes airline crew recovery, advertising allocation, production planning, staff scheduling, vehicle routing, inventory simulation optimization, marketing research, and enrollment management and optimization. The Simulation and Optimization for Inventory Management for the Kroger Corp, was selected as one of the six finalists worldwide for the 2013 Franz Edelman Prize for excellence in Operations Research. This is the highest award from Institute of Operations Research and Management Science (INFORMS). The INFORMS press release stated that 'Simulation and Optimization Improves Pharmacy Inventory Management at the Kroger Co. has reduced out-of-stocks by 1.5 million prescriptions, lowered inventory by more than $100M, and yielded additional revenue of more than $70M since Oct 2011.'